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Steve and Nat: Encapsulate Generics

February 21st, 2011 Comments off

I’m reading Growing Object-Oriented Software, Guided by Tests, by Steve Freeman and Nat Pryce. I was happy to find that the authors share a similar view on constructed generic types as I do.

Our rule of thumb is that we try to limit passing around types with generics […]. Particularly when applied to collections, we view it as a form of duplication. It’s a hint that there’s a domain concept that should be extracted into a type.

A less blunt way of saying what I tried to say in my own post.

If you’re interested in the book I can strongly recommend it. Although I’m only half-way through it I can already tell it’s the best TDD book I have read so far. I’ll have a brief review up in a coming post.

Cheers!

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Martin Fowler: Agile Doesn’t Matter That Much

July 30th, 2010 4 comments

Martin Fowler has an interesting post up called Utility vs Strategic Dichotomy. The point he’s making is that there are essentially two kinds of software projects, which he names utility and strategic, and that they need to be treated entirely different in the way you staff and run them.

Utility projects, he defines, are the ones that provide functions that are often necessary and crucial to run the business, but not a differentiating factor in competition with other companies.

A classic example of a utility IT project is payroll, everyone needs it, but it’s something that most people want to ‘just work’

Then he delivers hammer blow number one.

“Another consequence is that only a few projects are strategic. The 80/20 rule applies, except it may be more like 95/5.”

What Martin Fowler is saying is that a vast majority of us are doing work that is of no strategic importance to the business we support. I’m sure this statement cuts a wound in many developer’s and project manager’s self images, mine included. But I’m with Martin on this one. It’s time our sector gets its feet back on the ground and we start to realize that we’re here to support the business. Not the other way around.

Hammer blow number two.

Another way the dichotomy makes its influence felt is the role of agile methods. Most agilists tend to come from a strategic mindset, and the flexibility and rapid time-to-market that characterizes agile is crucial for strategic projects. For utility projects, however, the advantages of agile don’t matter that much.

I have a little harder swallowing this one. That the agile movement doesn’t “matter that much” while developing utility systems doesn’t ring true to me. Yes, time to customer is not as critical as in strategic projects, but that doesn’t mean that building the right system isn’t important to utility projects as well. And the agile values will help reducing cost and risk in any project, be it utility or strategic.

Cheers!